exploring new ways of eating

Based on the phonetic writing of the danish word for etiquette we launched this popup series in 2015 with William Milsted as the chef, Emil Lyders as the photographer, Jonas Grøn as the anthropologist and Anastasia Dimitriadou as the host.  The purpose is to find out how social norms for eating together are changing with the different settings in which we eat. They have organised garden parties, camping brunches, kitchen parties and street food 5-course dinners.

The [etikede] project has been sponsored by Royal Unibrew and supported by Copenhagen Cooking & Food Festival.

 
 
 
e25.jpg

stories of eating

During each popup the guests are asked to contribute with their stories. We've interviewed grandmothers to conceptualise the classic dinner party, listened to poems by Danish writer Jørgen Leth to figure out garden parties and gathered cases of the perfect kitchen parties to make it happen on purpose.

2016_08_19_Etikede_0049.jpg

creating matching menus

For each concept our chef has been developing a unique menu to match the theme. For a classical dinner party there were new versions of classic Danish dishes, for the garden party the favourite dishes of the poet Jørgen Leth and for a 5-course street food dinner you could eat every dish with your hands. And everyone did.

_H5A1144.jpg

designing personal spaces

[etikede] popups are public events but for occasions that are usually limited to friends and family. For this reason we have worked a lot on different ways to enter a shared space through personal entry-points. Guests have had personal maids, played croquet in mini-tournaments and been ringing doorbells in hip party areas of Copenhagen. 

2016_08_19_Etikede_0001.jpg

guiding guests into surprises

In a time of almost no fixed frames another crucial part of a modern etiquette is designing invitations and guiding the guests, so our photographer and host created 30 seconds invitation-videos and wrote welcome-speeches for everyone to be on the same page.

 
with a sizzling frying pan in hand, I grabbed some sausages and made some of the best hot dogs I’ve ever made, even if I do say so myself.
— Lloyd, Hand luggage only

"We knocked the door, which quickly opened where we were ushered inside! This vast, old industrial unit was filled with people, pumping electro-music and mountains of food all around. With a bottle of milk thrown into our hand (yes, a bottle of milk), we headed straight into the beating heart of the crowd..."

Read Lloyd's full story here.